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This is an idea I had to encourage excellent class work – as excellent examples of children’s work could make it onto the ‘Wall of Fame’ display board. The fact that this has flashing lights adds the specialness – therefore standard paper cut-out display lettering just wouldn’t do for this.

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November 12th, 2016

Posted In: Classroom

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I wanted to introduce servos into my programming and thought an automated door lock would be a simple and effective use of this cool piece of hardware. It looks cool anyway!

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September 2nd, 2016

Posted In: Arduino, Classroom, Computer Science, computing

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This post details the painting and assembly stage of my Noise-o-meter. This was probably the most time-consuming stage but also the most rewarding.

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May 4th, 2016

Posted In: Arduino, Classroom, Computer Science, computing

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This post follows on from Noise-o-meter Part 1: The Building and is the second part of my noise-o-meter construction project for use in classrooms. This post details the addition of some counter displays; having seen the LEDs lighting up as required in Part 1, I had the idea of adding counters to record where noise levels peak. This serves as an absolute record of just how loud the classroom is, and is easy enough to implement, so I decided to include them.

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May 3rd, 2016

Posted In: Arduino, Classroom, Computer Science, computing

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In this post I document the making of my Noise-o-meter. I didn’t plan on making anything of this kind, but I stumbled upon the Adafruit Digital NeoPixel LED strip and thought that a noise-o-meter would be the perfect way for me to utilise it within a classroom context – so I felt compelled to do it.

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May 3rd, 2016

Posted In: Arduino, Classroom, Computer Science, computing

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This post follows on from the Arduino USB Number Pad Project that I started earlier this year. That post was to prove a concept idea, and it worked as expected. This post covers the construction of a heavier duty number pad following the same principles – heavier duty so it can be used in the classroom to motivate learners with their times tables, so it needs to withstand some bashing.

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April 14th, 2016

Posted In: Arduino, Classroom, Computer Science, computing

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This is an Arduino project that I’ve been meaning to complete for some time now. Quite simply it’s a timer, but it’s not just any timer… it’s a Behaviour Timer. For those moments when you’re waiting for a class to stop talking yet a disapproving stare just doesn’t seem to work. Something that never fails in these moments, I’ve found, is the presence of a timer – time the teacher wastes having to wait is made up during break/lunch time – the Behaviour Timer keeps track of this.

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March 28th, 2016

Posted In: Arduino, Classroom, Computer Science, computing

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google-maps

A great use of technology for geography is Google Maps. The more structured lesson idea that I describe below uses Google’s My Maps, which requires a Google account – so this probably isn’t for individual students to experiment with, though an alternative would be to just use the online interface via a browser.

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November 12th, 2015

Posted In: google

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The new national curriculum for computing (primary) distinguishes 3 main strands: computer science, information technology and digital literacy. While the incorporation of the computer science strand may be obvious (using scratch and the like), the other two are open to some interpretation. Using the guidance set out in the CAS publication, Computing in the National Curriculum and the National Curriculum itself, I’ve come up with a way that incorporates these for a multipurpose activity- a class blog.

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November 3rd, 2015

Posted In: Classroom, computing, Digital Literacy, Information Technology

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For this one I wanted a route to be pre-programmed – so it could be worked on independently using Scratch, then tested using the Raspberry Pi. The Benefit being that fine tuning can happen using the Stage in Scratch, along with all the learning and discussion about programming concepts – the Raspberry Pi rover just replicates this practically, in the real world. Well it makes it all that bit more fun anyway!

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October 30th, 2015

Posted In: computing, Raspberry Pi, Scratch

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